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Book Reviews Essays Political Theory Reviews

Pre-Marxism in the Last Instance: A Review of Chantal Mouffe’s “For a Left Populism”

by Brant Roberts
“The current political order is riddled with obstacles along legal and economic lines, not to mention the concrete structure of the state, making social democratic reforms appear more utopian than communism.”

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History from the Non-Region: A Review of Kristen Ghodsee’s Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War

by Brant Roberts
“Undoubtedly this book will ruffle the feathers of many western liberal feminists who feel that they, and they alone, brought equal rights for women to the rest of the world and felt themselves to be the shining beacon of freedom for all women to follow.

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Book Reviews Reviews

Review of “Capital, Nature, and the Unfinished Critique of Political Economy: Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism” by Kohei Saito

by Adam Benden
“The book is of interest for Marxist scholarship but also clearly seeks to catalyze a shift in politics in ecology and environmental politics as well. An ecosocialist Marx is being excavated to return to the necessity of his analysis to challenge capitalism’s destruction of the environment.”

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A Futurism without a Future: A Review of Aaron Bastani’s “Fully Automated Luxury Communism”

by Brant Roberts
“For Bastani, it is easier to imagine mining asteroids and a work-free utopia than to imagine unalienated labor and socialism.”

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Book Reviews Reviews

Review of Kristen Ghodsee’s “Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism”

by Brant Roberts
“In short, the author walks a fine line between conservative criticism of socialism and uncritically embracing the system, all while asking the readers to take into account what could work for everyone in a democratic-socialist future.”

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Book Reviews Essays Political Theory Reviews

Alain Badiou’s Hypothesis and the Arab Left as Contemporaries of May 68

by Dabya
“What united them was not the vocabulary of classes or proletarian leadership, but the vocabulary of revolution and change in the broadest sense. For those who incorporated their bodies, thoughts, affects, and potentialities into a certain political truth procedure, and who became ‘militant[s] of this truth,’ the change had to look a certain way..”